Gentle 15 and 25 week training schedule for running your first 5K race on about 15 miles per week..

From chapter six of "Running Dialogue" by David Holt, who has helped hundreds of people run their fitness test, or 5Ks.


Exercising gently at the beginning is the key to maintaining regular aerobic exercise for a healthy heart and healthy life.
More health and fitness topics from author and Registered Nurse David Holt
Running is Aerobic exercise, aerobic running, aerobic training, or simply aerobic.

Fifteen week training schedule for running a 5K race or Public Safety Fitness run

The three mile timed run typical of most military, police, fire
and other public safety departments is not a challenge to the
recreational runner. But it can be tough on non-runners be¨
cause they are:
	* in poor overall shape--whether doing the test for the 
		first time, or doing their annual re-test
	* or they are somewhat muscle bound in the upper body
	* are often overweight
	* have a tendency toward strength or anaerobic ability.

* Poor fitness level.
How often have you exercised in the
last 9 months while flying a desk. Read Part One of Running Dialogue:
then get your gluteal (butt) muscles and the rest of your body
out there, and start at the level which wonít kill you. Build up to
three to four miles, four times a week.

* Naturally muscle bound.
The other aspects of the fitness test will be easy. While get¨
ting ready for the run, ease back on any gym or weight work.
Use your arms to practice an economical running style.

* Overweight.
Canít get away from this one--fat will slow you down. Decrease
your intake by 500 calories a day, and you will lose a pound
per week. Second helpings; deserts; second and subsequent
beers; regular soda; cheese and mayo on a hamburger...cut
some or all for significant calorie savings. The exercise you
are doing will help, too. Read the nutirtion chapter of Running Dialogue.

* Anaerobic or fast twitch muscle fibers.
These can be taught to work with oxygen. Steady runs will
educate them to some degree.
After at least a month of steady running you can move onto
interval work...a type of training which has been around for
decades, yet still isnít used by most fitness runners.
	Run an easy mile. Run twelve times one hundred yards;
use meters if you prefer. Do them at a good pace, but not an
all out sprint. Jog back between strides to catch your breath.
Run a mile to finish off. Next time, do 16 efforts. Alternate
these interval sessions with an easy run, so that you run fast
twice a week.
	After four sessions of 100s, do two sessions of 200s...eight
the first time, 12 the second. Then for two more weeks:
	Day one...Run 20 x 100 meters
	Day two...easy run
	Day three...Run 16 x 200 meters	 
	Day four...easy run
For the final six weeks before the test, keep the two easy runs.
The third session, do eight 200s plus ten 100s. Do it as a con¨
tinuous run with 100 easy between efforts. 

	The first session each week will be long efforts. Your
preparation should include 800s, 1200s and 1600s; these are
half, three quarter and mile repeats.
 	Week one. Run 3 x 800 at 10 seconds per mile faster than
target pace for your test. This will increase your maximum
oxygen assimilation ability--itíll open up your lungs. Take a
good rest between efforts. If it matters to you, this is VO2
maximum pace.
	Week two. 2 x one mile at 10 seconds per mile slower
than target pace. Doesnít sound right, does it? World record breakers train at this pace. It will be your
anaerobic threshold pace, which as plenty of Ph.D. types will
tell you, helps you to run the test better, despite running the
session slower than target pace. Actually, the threshold is
closer to 20 seconds slower than test pace, but we want you
to keep the session closer to your target pace.
	Week three. 3 x 1200 at target pace. This is to check
your pace judgment. If you get the first lap wrong, make half
the adjustment in the next lap, and get it close to perfect on
the last lap. Five minutes should be enough rest.
	Week four. 4 x 800 as week one.
	Week five. Repeat week two. Itís ten to fourteen days till
the test. Donít increase training this week. Donít overtrain. Reduce the other session to 6 x
200 plus 6 x 100.
	Week six. Two 1200s at target pace.
	cut  a mile off of each easy run.
	Day four do 4 x 200 plus 4 x 100
This avoids over-training...still a common problem of public
safety test takers, and first time 5K runners. Sufficient rest will give you a 10 percent increase in
your potential performance. Meaning youíll begin serious
hurting at two and a quarter miles instead of at one and a
quarter. You have a greater chance of success if rested.

 	If you had 25 instead of 15 weeks to prepare for the 5K, youíd
use fartlek from Part Two of Running Dialogue for variety from the 100 and 200s;
include some resistance type sessions from Part Four, and
some  300-400 efforts borrowed from Part Five. 

	In summary then, if youíve got 15 weeks
At least four weeks of steady running to get the heart ready
for:
Five weeks of twice weekly short intervals...100s and 200s;
then:
Six weeks of long repetitions.

	25 weeks...as above...then
Five weeks of hills or other resistance training once a week.
Three weeks of 400s, alternating with two weeks of 300 meter
reps once a week.
And rest up for the test.

Adapted from:


Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


Marathon down to 5K at www.runningbook.com
Sample Chapter from Running Dialogue...Chapter Five, Long Reps at Threshold Pace
5k training and racing...the first of five pages for the 5k runner...with more serious intentions
Running Dialogue table of contents
Running Nutrition and Diet
Running Injury prevention
Half marathon training...explains anaerobic threshold
Hill training and running at VO2 max pace...typically 2 mile to 5k race pace
10k training...mileage and strength and access to four other parts of 10k training
Sarcomere--muscle contraction unit
Fartlek: an entertaining form of running
Stretching and Flexibility

E-MAIL ORDER TO DAVID HOLT
Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
David Holt's second running book: 10K & 5K Running, Training and Racing.
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)

Copyright David Holt 2,000 Any part, or all of this training material may be quoted or reviewed...provided you acknowledge the source...Running Dialogue and other books by David Holt, this web page or www.runningbook.com, and contact me at holtrun@sprynet.com to let me know the material is being used or reviewed.