Running economy and VO2 max is improved by running intervals of 200-600 meters at 2 mile to 5K pace...Your running efficiency and racing at distances from the marathon to 5K will benefit from interval training


8k or 5 mile race training...running long reps at VO2 max
VO2 maximum prediction from running a 15 minute time trial
Marathon down to 5K at www.runningbook.com

The longer title for our subject is of course maximum oxygen uptake capacity.

VO2 Maximum Training: Short Interval Running for 10K and other Distance Races

This is a sample from Running Dialogue by David Holt...copyright 1997. Material may be used without first gaining my permission, but please give credit to the source.

5K running speed for interval training at VO2 max should 2-3 seconds per 400 meters faster than your recent 10 k race pace. When training at 2 mile pace use 4-5 seconds per lap faster than 10k pace, or 2 seconds faster than 5k pace.
This section is from chapter 11 of Running Dialogue...making progression with interval training. The basics of interval training were covered in chapter 10; more advanced running tips come in chapter 12.

Interval Running...Progression

You continue to improve speed, endurance and running form by changing your intervals:

* Run faster in the effort...up to 2 mile race pace.
* Take a shorter distance recovery 
* Put more effort into the recovery (jogging for a minute instead of
walking)
* Or, increasing the number of efforts.
He continued. “The prudent runner will only change one of these
factors at a time.
	“A runner specializing in the shorter distances will generally aim
for a lowish number of quite fast repetitions--thus ensuring part of
each effort puts him well into oxygen debt. He will increase the
speed of the efforts until he is running faster than race pace...then
steadily decrease the recovery period session by session. He may
also reduce the number of repetitions to enable him to achieve the
extra speed.”
	“What about the 10 k or 10 mile racer?”
	“Upon achieving the required speed, they will decrease the re¬
covery period, and then increase the number of repetitions.”
	“So he’ll run the repeats at the same pace,” I said.
	“Yes. Once target pace is attained, aim to run more repetitions at
that pace.
	“You see David, one of the aims of interval training is to get the
body used to running fast for a long (overall) period of time. Inter¬
val work allows you to do huge amounts of mileage at fast training 
pace--yet without wearing yourself out. Achieve the target speed,
then emphasize improving endurance at that speed.”

Both specialists could progress along the following lines at first. 
	Week 1      8 x 400 in 72 secs 400 jog
	Week 3    10 x 400 in 72 secs 400 jog
	Week 5    12 x 400 in 72 secs 400 jog
	Week 7    10 x 400 in 72 secs 300 jog 
	Week 9    12 x 400 in 72 secs 300 jog
 	Week 11    8 x 400 in 72 secs 200 jog
	Week 13  10 x 400 in 72 secs 200 jog
	Week 15  12 x 400 in 72 secs 200 jog

	“For the next two sessions of 400s, it would be a good idea to
consolidate your gains. Weeks 17 and 19 could be the same as
week 15. Then move on to 8 x 400 in 70 secs with 400 jog ( if re¬
quiring more speed); or increase the number of efforts if looking for
greater endurance...only you can set the limit on the number. Each
time you increase the speed of your reps, a greater proportion of
the repetition is anaerobic. As you get stronger; as your muscles get
used to the new speed; as your body learns to process more
oxygen, (with a nudge from your steady runs), it becomes more
aerobic. Over a period of months, the anaerobic training changes to
aerobic training: You will be able to race faster.
	“You’ll find that while aiming for the 72s, some of your efforts
will be closer to 70. If you make a conscious effort to run every
fourth rep faster--that is, to intentionally run a 70--moving to
regular 70s will come easier. The occasional faster rep also helps to
break up the session.”
“Avoid doing any session more than once every two weeks,” he
said.
	“But you have me doing 200s on consecutive weeks.”
	“True. But that was to prepare you for the 300s; which them¬
selves got you ready for the 400s. There is often an exception to a
general rule. 
	“You need to avoid doing 400s or 200s week in, week out.
Doing the same session will only make you good at running that
session. The 200s and 300s do something for you which the 400s
won’t. Don’t miss out on their benefits.

	“In practice, you may run 400s every three weeks. The 17 ses¬
sions will give you a full year of progression. Progress along similar
lines for the other track sessions. Week two could be 12 x 300
meters with 300 jog; week four 12 x 300 with 200 jog and week
ten 10 x 300 with 100 jog. The 300s will be run at perhaps the
equivalent of a 70 second lap....When you move on to 400s in 70
seconds, it’s a natural progression in terms of increasing the speed
of the 400s because you run the extra 100 meters at the speed you
had been running 300s.
	“By the time you reach that level, you will be running your 300s
comfortably at sixty-eight second 400 pace.”
	“Use the speed of your current 300s as your target for next
year’s 400s. Like in Part Three, your progress will be phenomenal
for a while, but be prepared for it to slow as you get close to your
potential--the potential at your current level of training. Keep the
speed of reps in a proper relationship to your race pace. There’s
little point in running excessively faster than racing speed.
	“Try running 200s at your best 1500 or mile speed; the 300s at
3,000 meters (or two mile) pace; with the 400s being at 5,000 me¬
ters pace. Gradually increase the speed so that 2, 3 and 400s are run
at 800, 1500 and 3000 meter pace. Aim to run two or more times
the distance of the race during these sessions. If you’re running at
3,000 pace, aim for 6,000 in the interval session.

	

There you have it. Run 300s at 2 mile pace; plus the 600s at 5K pace, 400s at either pace and you shouldn't go too far wrong. If racing 5K...run them at 2 mile pace; racing 10K...then 5K pace running is fine.
5K pace running will not open up your lungs quite as much as two mile pace (5K pace is only 95 percent of your maximum oxygen uptake capacity), but the slower pace is easier on the body. It is also easier to work on economical running form at 5K race pace!
Match each one with a session of long reps as described in:

8k or 5 mile race training...long reps at VO2max
Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


Marathon down to 5K at www.runningbook.com

Running Long reps and rest when peaking.
My distance running homepage
VO2 maximum prediction from 15 minute time trial
5k training and racing...the first of five pages for the 5k runner
10k training...mileage and strength and access to four other parts of 10k training
12K distance running, racing and training advice
Running injury prevention
Running nutrition and diet
Running Dialogue table of contents
Stretching and Flexibility for distance running
Running economy from downhill training practice
Half marathon running, training and racing
Marathon long distance training and racing
Marathon Training phase three...VO2 max intervals
Links to other distance training, injury and diet

Book Ordering Information
E-MAIL ORDER TO DAVID HOLT
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com
Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
David Holt's second running book: 10K & 5K Running, Training and Racing.
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com
Copyright David Holt 2,000 Any part, or all of this training material may be quoted or reviewed...provided you acknowledge the source...Running Dialogue and other books by David Holt, this web page or www.runningbook.com, and contact me at holtrun@sprynet.com to let me know the material is being used or reviewed.
This page is improving VO2 max with short interval training