Long runs for Middle or Long Distance Running, Racing and Training, build aerobic base. Long steady aerobic runs are a prime element at all race distances...The 20 mile and 30K is used as example. 1:46 30k runner David Holt shows the long run within the context of a balanced training, running or racing program. Aerobic (VO2 Maximum ) and Anaerobic Threshold have their place, as do hills and other resistance training and rest--but the Long Run is still the King.

Long distance runs increase Mitochondria numbers and size, and Red Blood Cells (RBCs) Production.

The 30k and 20 mile race are the perfect step to the marathon.

Some of David Holt's other pages

Anaerobic threshold using half marathon running and racing as example
10k training...mileage and strength

Middle distance stars Herb Elliot and Steve Ovett used long runs as an integral part of their training, as do any middle distance runners who expect to come close to achieving their potential. But how far should a miler run?

Arthur Lydiard thinks they should run as far as their bodies are able to, just like a marathon runner does. Racing middle distance does not mean low mileage. You still need to build a sound aerobic base to do well at middle distance racing.

But what about the rest of us, who are aiming for a say a 20 mile race.

The same rules apply. The more miles you are able to physically and psychologically put in, the stronger your legs will be: You will race faster. Low mileage training is great for recreation, but there is no reason why a 10K or 20 mile race person should be running less mileage than a marathon runner.

The typical training suggestions in books or magazines suggest 60 mile weeks for marathon racing, 50 mile weeks for half marathon racing and 40 miles for 10k racing. Get down to 5k and they are likely to suggest 30 miles. How do you build aerobic base on 30 miles a week. At all these distances, and the mile, you need a 15 mile distance run most weeks to build stamina, aerobic pathways, mitochondria, red blood cells, and prepare you for aerobic strides and VO2 max enhancing intervals and threshold pace distance training as discussed on my other pages.

If you are going to race well at any distance, you need to put in Long Runs, and decent mileage.

20 mile racing or 30 kilometer training preparation.

Let's expand on two things. The Long Run compared to the Marathon; and, Anaerobic pace to race 20 miles & 30K.

The long run

One purpose of 22 milers in marathon training is to enhance fat burning to preserve glycogen supplies, which would otherwise run out at about the 20 mile point. The wall. Provided you take adequate rest prior to the race, and eat sufficient carbohydrates, the wall is still in the distance at the end of a 20 mile race. You may feel the wall, but you should not have to run through it. Twenty mile racing comes down to pace judgement, and medium long runs.

But medium long distance runs compared to what!

Compared to marathon training, your long runs will be modest. 17 or 18 miles most times; some weeks only 15; occasionally, a 20. The longer ones will be no faster than in marathon training; the 15s will be 15-30 seconds per mile faster than in marathon training.

Once you've got used to the long runs, every third week, or every third long run, include 8-10 miles within 15-30 seconds of your target 20 mile or 30k race pace. This teaches you the correct running form needed to maintain efficiency at close to race pace. Target running pace will then be second nature to your running muscles.

Anaerobic Threshold for 30k Training

My half marathon page discusses lactate threshold pace, but the 30k allows you to train at the lower levels of threshold pace, closer to 80 percent max heartrate.

Running at 80 percent max HR during half marathon training would have meant training exactly at race pace. What we usually look for is one notch faster than goal race pace. Thus, we recommended 15k race pace as the ideal preperation speed for half marathons.

Half marathon speed is fast enough for 20 mile race preparation.

The 10-15 seconds per mile decrease in pace which half marathon speed gives you compared to 15K speed, makes the running easier, and probably decreases injury risk. Yet you are still close to or at threshold pace. Do four to five mile tempo runs at half marathon pace, or run long intervals with short rest.

After several sessions of long intervals, you can increase pace on the last one or two reps. Edge down toward 15k pace for the last mile of a two mile rep, or the last two reps of six times one mile. But don't get carried away. Stay in control, run at comfortably hard pace. You'll be getting your speed training in the VO2 Max sessions.

Which brings me to Training Schedules for these more humane distances.

Go to the marathon training and racing page, and use all three types of training. The long run can be shorter than in marathon training, the threshold pace closer to 80 percent max. It's as simple as that.

Slot each type of distance training in, based on the percentage which that element should be. Running one hundred miles per week, you can handle 10, one mile repeats at anaerobic threshold pace. If your body only allows you 100 per month, running three mile repeats one week with a three mile tempo run the next will do you good. But run the base aerobic stuff for your mitochondria and red blood cell production first.



Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


Training the muscle fiber unit...the sarcomere
Marathon racing, running and training
Marathon Training--intermediate to advanced
Anaerobic threshold using half marathon running and racing as example
VO2 Max (Maximum Oxygen Uptake Capacity) using Interval training for 8k, 5 miles and 10k as example
5k training and racing...the first of five pages for the 5k runner
10k training...mileage and strength and access to four other parts of 10k training
Half marathon training...first element...mileage and hills for strength
Middle and Long distance running cross training--bicycle
Recreational running: 5k racing on low mileage, 15-25 week preparation for race, or public safety fitness test
Red blood cell stimulation with altitude training
Running book (David Holt) homepage
Links to more Long Distance Running, Training and Racing advice

E-MAIL ORDER TO DAVID HOLT
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com
Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


David Holt's second running book: 10K & 5K Running, Training and Racing.
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com
Copyright David Holt 2,000 Any part, or all of this training material may be quoted or reviewed...provided you acknowledge the source...Running Dialogue and other books by David Holt, this web page or www.runningbook.com, and contact me at holtrun@sprynet.com to let me know the material is being used or reviewed.