Marathon running & training: In marathon training you should balance three types of quality speedwork with long distance running and rest. Whether you're an intermediate or advanced marathon runner is determined by the time and effort you put into your training.

Marathon Training: Marathon training is about balancing the following five training elements.

Hill training, anaerobic threshold running, VO2 maximum stimulation, mileage...with rest. See the marathon connections near the base of the page for more details.

Copyright David Holt 2,000 Any part, or all of this training material may be quoted or reviewed...provided you acknowledge the source...Running Dialogue and other books by David Holt, this web page or www.runningbook.com, and contact me at holtrun@sprynet.com to let me know the material is being used or reviewed.

Marathon Training, Running and Racing...intermediate and advanced

40 mile per week marathon runners...your first or your fastest marathon, go to:


Marathon down to 5K at www.runningbook.com

50 to 60 mile per week runners:

Here's a basic marathon schedule for the 50-60 mile a week runner.
The goal--Work on the endurance to complete 26.2 miles at close to
half marathon speed. 
	At this level, running two speed sessions a week is ideal. You
can then run both types of speedwork each week.
* Anaerobic Threshold Running: 15K or Ten mile race pace
Alternate:
four to six miles of tempo running,  	 
2 mile reps,              	
2,000s,                               	  
mile repeats                         	 
All at 15K race pace.
Add 8 miles at 5 seconds slower than half marathon pace, 
and 8 x 800 at 10K pace for variety.

Repeat these six sessions once for a fourteen week build-up. The
pre-marathon week, and post longest race (in the build-up) week,
youíll run less...run two times one mile at half marathon pace.

* VO2 Max--two mile...or for the faint-hearted 5K race pace
	Hills...Run them at two mile intensity, not one mile.
	400s...run about 16 reps
	300s...run 20
	200s...keep the rest short...donít run too fast
	Fartlek...run mostly short efforts

	800s...not in the week you run them at 10K pace
	     run six only at 5K pace. Running 8 x 600 would be fine.
Again, each session can be run twice. Rest up by running five 400s four
days pre-marathon; You'll probably run eight 300s the week
before the long¨est race. 
	Give VO2 max running a miss the week after your long race...
running the two times a cruising mile will help your recovery.

This is what your marathon training week will look like.

Days one and four can be swapped.

Day one...anaerobic threshold training, with warmup etc	
Day two...longest run of week--run at marathon pace plus one
to one and a half mins a mile	
Day three...run easy for 3-7 miles 
Day four...VO2 max running
Day five...easy 6
Day six...second longest run--half a minute per mile slower than mara¨
thon pace. Every third week, include at least six miles of running at
marathon race pace. 	
Day seven...easy 0-7
 
Run at least a couple of miles the day after your long run, or ride a
gentle 10-20 miles, or take a walk. How much mileage you run beyond
the four basic sessions is up to you. Exercise physiologists tell us there
are minimal gains to be made beyond 80 miles a week of running: 
The Kenyans donít appear to be listening.
The trick is to find your training limit. Provided you still enjoy 
most of your training, and you remain fresh enough to run fast in 
your speedwork, go ahead with more running.
 
For alternate short runs, include some strideouts--run about 8 pickups of
100 meters to make sure the hamstrings and fast twitch fibers get some
work. Otherwise: 
keep your feet close to the ground to minimize pounding;
take short, fast strides to maintain legspeed;
be efficient and economical....donít let these short runs become
junk miles. 
watch for body changes and injuries.

Take care with the regular speedwork. If youíre too tired to train at 15K
pace on your designated day--and quite frankly, you should always be
able to cruise long intervals at 15K pace--make adjustments to your
mileage.

Exercise physiologists tell us physiological adaptation relating
to endurance and muscle strength, from training, takes at least
14 days. Therefore, the longest run must be at least 2 weeks
before the marathon to give any benefit.  According to most
coaches, the longest training run for a marathon must be at
least 18 miles. But it takes a good series of base runs to build
up to the 18 miler. 
Bone and connective tissue adaptation takes months rather
than weeks. Assessment about marathon readiness should be
based on the length of runnersí longest run each week for at
least the last 8 weeks; and, how well the body reacted to the
longer runs. 
Repeat a 14 or 21 day schedule several times. Each time you
go through the schedule, add two miles to the longest run, (until
it reaches 20), and a mile to the two most important speed
sessions, (until youíre running 5 miles worth). 
Then rest up for the race.

When you can run twenty miles, alternate it with a 16 to 18 miler--
or a longish race. A good marathon training build-up will include two 
10Ks, a ten mile and a half-marathon race, and 4 to 5 runs of 20 miles.


This intermediate marathon training schedule is adapted from:


Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)



Running injury preventions: Preventing running injuries
Fartlek for marathon training
Marathon Training phase one...hills / resistance training
Marathon Training phase two...anaerobic threshold
Marathon Training phase three...VO2 max intervals
Marathon training, phase 4, resting up
Long distance runs...discussed on the 30k / 20 mile racing page
Sarcomere--muscle contraction unit
Marathon training and racing, the basic running schedule for beginners
Half marathon training...first element...mileage and hills for strength
10k training...mileage and strength and access to four other parts of 10k training
5k training and racing...the first of five pages for the 5k runner
Distance running links: mine mostly. Includes injury, diet, cross training etc.
Art Liberman's Marathon Running Links...State of the art Marathon Training
David's Humorous Distance Running and Training book...table of contents page

Book Ordering Information

Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


David Holt's second running book: 10K & 5K Running, Training and Racing.
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com
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