Marathon training & running: Anaerobic threshold runs at 15K to half marathon race pace improve marathon racing potential by increasing speed endurance-- your ability to process oxygen rises. You run faster with less effort.

Marathon Training, Phase two: Anaerobic Threshold Training by Author David Holt

Copyright David Holt 2,000 Any part, or all of this training material may be quoted or reviewed...provided you acknowledge the source...Running Dialogue and other books by David Holt, this web page or www.runningbook.com, and contact me at holtrun@sprynet.com to let me know the material is being used or reviewed.

Sample Chapter from Running Dialogue...Chapter Five, Long Reps at Threshold Pace
David Holt's Homepage
Marathon Training--intermediate to advanced
Marathon Training phase one...hills / resistance training
Marathon Training phase three...VO2 max intervals
Anaerobic threshold for half marathon running

Phase two of four...Anaerobic threshold training

Marathon Training, Running and Racing...With the emphasis on Anaerobic Threshold Running

Marathon Running.
Second phase Marathon Training. 2-8 weeks
Youíve worked on Aerobic Base and Resistance Training;
VO2 max training; and REST will be phase three and four. 

Marathon Training--tempo or anaerobic threshold
speed/capacity--Cruise Intervals at 15 k or 10 mile pace
...by 71 min half marathon runner David Holt. 

After a good build up of base at 60-80 percent maximum
heartrate, strides, and a hill training phase, you can bring in
Tempo runs. Early sessions will be barely over 80 percent
max heartrate--long intervals with a short breather...more
for mental than physical recovery. You'll need to think about
form on these reps. You will run comfortably hard; you will
never run all out for these sessions. Run a threshold pace
session every 5 days or so; keep them short enough that
you remain fresh for your other quality sessions which
complement it. 

After a few sessions, you'll be able to increase pace
towards 90 percent maximum heartrate. Many physiologists
recommend 90 as the top range for this running. Most of
these runs will be at 15 k or 10 mile pace to hit that pulse
target. When tired two days after your long run, or when
weather is bad, it may be half marathon pace: It will rarely
be slower. If your heartrate is 90 percent at your half
marathon pace, you should add rest to the next few days.
Don't be concerned if you are able to run at 10 K pace at 90
percent max. These good days are a joy...provided you're
not overtraining. Achy quads are a key sign of overtraining. 
However, 10 k pace puts most of us over the red line, it is
too harsh. As Jack Daniels Ph.D. says, "86 percent is
probably the best pace." About 10 seconds per mile slower
than 10 K pace if you've never raced the longer distance.

According to Jack Daniels: "Anaerobic Threshold is the
pace or intensity beyond which blood lactate concentration
increases dramatically, due to your bodyís inability to
supply all its oxygen needs. As you get fitter, your red line
rises from about 80 percent of maximum heartrate to 90-95
percent. 
Physiologically, threshold training teaches muscle cells to
use more oxygen--so less lactate is produced. Your body
also becomes better at clearing lactate: Race day red line
SPEED rises." 

When running at 15 k pace, the 1,000s and 800s will need
a 200 rest to ensure you give the muscles a chance to
educate themselves. Match each session with some kind of
speed at short distances. Eight or so strides on a recovery
day counts also!

When working on Buffering Capacity--alternate Continuous
Tempo Runs, with Cruise Intervals: Try...
6 miles at Half marathon race pace...probably 80
percent max heartrate
one and a half mile reps...three or more. Close to 90
percent max HR if it feels right. One to two minutes rest.
4 miles at 15k or 10 mile pace...true threshold tempo
speed 85-86 max 
HR. Hopefully, without accumulating lactic acid.
Mile reps at your red line...10 k pace, but stay in control
Half mile repeats with short rest.
Then repeat the five sessions if you have sufficient time
But restrict threshold pace to 10 percent of your marathon
training miles.

Keep the Hill or resistance training sessions every 14 days
or so to maintain the strength and knee lift from phase one.

Long run during marathon training

Long distance runs.
The longest will be 3-4 mile more than in phase one--up to
20 miles, or one third of your average weekly miles--at 65
to 70 percent max HR. 
The second longest will be 14 or one quarter the average
weeks total.
If you intend to RACE the marathon you'll need a couple of
those 14s to include 6-8 miles at 75 percent max HR, which
will be close to marathon pace for most runners.

When to run quality during marathon training

I believe you should run a quality session the day before
each long run--you don't need fresh legs to run easy. After
appropriate rest, you're ready to run the second speed session
of the week.

You should bounce back from speed sessions rapidly--if
you canít, then you have run too hard for your current fitness
level.

Buffering capacity, anaerobic threshold, lactate
gigididoo...it doesn't matter what we call them, the science
backs them up. Staying in control, running with good
economy while cruising at 15 k or 10 mile pace brings huge
rewards provided it is not over used. Six to ten sessions will
bring you most of the gains. Then maintain those gains
while working at the final aspect of your marathon running. 

Note that Jeff Galloway in his book on Running recommends that you run mile repeats at 20 seconds faster than marathon goal pace, which is anaerobic threshold pace. Start with three reps and add one or two every two weeks to reach a maximum of 13 reps at least three weeks prior to your marathon.



Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com
Marathon down to 5K at www.runningbook.com
Marathon training and racing, the basic running schedules
Marathon Training--intermediate to advanced
Marathon Training phase one...hills / resistance training
Marathon Training phase three...VO2 max intervals
Sarcomere--muscle contraction unit
Racing 20 miles or 30k: Excellent step to marathon running
10k training...mileage and strength and access to four other parts of 10k training
5k training and racing...the first of five pages for the 5k runner
Distance running links: mine mostly. Includes injury, diet, cross training etc

E-MAIL ORDER TO DAVID HOLT
Running Dialogue">Running Dialogue at barnesandnoble.com
Buy Running Dialogue Today! ">Running Dialogue, 280 pages, $17.95, by David Holt. Training for the 5K to the Marathon, for beginners and experienced runners, with extensive injury prevention and treatment advice, nutrition, cartoons and inspirational essays, at Amazon.com

Or send $17.95 per book to David Holt at PO Box 543, Goleta, CA 93116. (includes shipping and tax)


David Holt's second running book: 10K & 5K Running, Training and Racing.
Buy 10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing Today! ">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing, 180 pages, $17.95, by David Holt (plus 3,000 meters, 8K, 12K and 10 mile training advice and schedules for 20-100 miles per week) at Amazon.com
10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing">10K & 5K Running, Training & Racing: The Running Pyramid, at Barnesandnoble.com
Art Liberman's Marathon Running Links...State of the art Marathon Training
This was...Marathon Training, Phase two: Anaerobic Threshold by David Holt