Overpronation is a running inconvenience. Most of us pronate naturally on every running stride. Overpronation can cause injury, or waste energy.

From the injury advice pages of Running Dialogue, by David Holt

	OVERPRONATION
Not an injury, but let’s raise a few eyebrows by calling it one.
Symptoms - Overpronation causes a pain in the arch of the foot which can radiate to¬
ward the toes. Pain on the inside of the shin as the foot rolls
over too far. You may notice the inside of your shoes are
compressed more than the outside; the inside feels spongy
when you put pressure on it. Look at your shoes on a table; if
they tilt inwards, you probably overpronate.
Overpronation Causes - Slapping the feet too much, weak ligaments of the
feet and ankles.
Overpronation Prevention - Recognizing you pronate too much is the first
problem. Most runners land on the outside of the foot, which
then rolls over as the foot passes through its support phase.
Some runners feet roll too far, placing extra pressure on the
inside of the leg. Four minute and nine minute milers over¬
pronate. Check your stride length-- if it’s too long, you may
not be able to control the excessive movements. Improve
muscle tone with rotation exercises of the ankle.
Overpronation Treatment - You should benefit from one of the antiprona¬
tion shoes. The basic design is for a harder material on the
inside of the shoe, either in the form of a wedge--thickening
toward the medial side of the shoe, or a block. A negative
heel counter or other stabilizing structure may also be used.
Different pronators need different amounts of resistance on
the inside to stop them rolling over. Just because your
overpronating friend swears by his ‘newbok’ 75s, doesn’t mean
they’ll suit you. Have an experienced runner at the track
watch your form, or get yourself video taped. An expert in a
running shoe store is your best specialist. Show him or her
some of your old running shoes; have them watch you test
run a few pairs. 

	Your feet may roll at different rates--the wonkiest foot needs
correcting. Stop that one from wobbling on each stride, and
the better foot’s workload will be lessened. Heed the
store-person’s advice; but give a nod to how each shoe feels
to you. Arch supports or orthotics inside the shoe may also be
needed. 
	Overpronation causes many other problems, including
Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome--an irritation of the posterior tibial
nerve behind the medial maleolus. Seek an expert if you can’t
find the cause.

Strictly speaking, overpronation is not an injury, but it is a sympton or a cause of many running injuries.


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This page is overpronation...a running inconvenience. Most of us pronate naturally on every running stride. Overpronation can cause injury, or waste energy.